• The Rubens House in a nutshell

    “Welcome to my house!” Peter Paul Rubens, a brilliant and versatile artist, invites you to his palazzo.
Plan your visit
Here you will find useful information about the location, ticket sales, packages, opening hours, accessibility and accessibility of the museum.
The Rubens House is one of the most renowned artist's residences worldwide.
The permanent collection contains a large number of works by the master himself and by his peers and contemporaries. The museum also has works on loan, as well as recent acquisitions and updates about works that are being restored.
Antwerp Baroque 2018. Rubens inspires
Rubens will be your host this year for the cultural city festival ‘Antwerp Baroque 2018: Rubens Inspires’. You can look forward to a bold and overflowing programme of Baroque, old and new. The Rubens House is the starting point for the celebrations.
Friday 01 June 2018 - Sunday 13 January 2019 from 10:00 to 17:00
Individual visitors
New masterpieces and uncovered secrets are what the Rubens House has in store for you during ‘Antwerp Baroque 2018’. The collection will be enriched with new masterpieces, while you can discover Rubens’s secrets thanks to the restoration of his self-portrait and the portico and garden pavilion.
Leading Lady of the Baroque
Two of Antwerp’s museums, the Rubens House and the MAS, have uniquely joined forces to present the first survey anywhere in the world of the work of Michaelina Wautier (1604–1689).
About Rubens
He was capable of everything and knew everything. He was a brilliant and versatile artist, run a large studio, spoke several languages, collected art, designed his own home, travelled around Europe as a diplomat and was interested in science. Rubens was well-versed in almost everything.
Peter Paul Rubens and Antwerp. The master and his city. After more than 400 years, this world-class painter's presence can still be felt in the city.
The Self-portrait of P.P Rubens is being restored. The masterpiece with iconic value rarely leaves its place. But has been sent to Brussels where it is being restored by the Royal Institute for Cultural Heritage.